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20121006
20121014
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WETA 14
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English 14
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
. when the civil rights movement happened, they shifted. i remember discussions in the 1980's and 1990's. the latino community, to be appealed to on issues like small government and family values, and they wrote off that possibility, quite frankly, with racism, seeing every brown person, every latino, as an illegal. they have done the same thing with the asian community. they used to be very republican. coming from hostile countries -- they have been driven into the democratic party with subtle and not so subtle racial appeals. i think they believe if they can do what they did in 2010, they can turn out their older white bass, and they can hold onto power, and they can -- they can turn out their older what it -- white base -- it is not a permanent strategy, but it can keep them in power for a while. and it is ugly. tavis: the new book from joan walsh is "what's the matter with white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she tells a wonderful story about her family and their presence. i have only scratched the surface, so you may want to pick it up. joan, thank you. >> th
. she has dedicated her life -- her grandfather really worked hard for civil rights in texas when she was growing up. he fought the plan will heart out there. so when my mother was -- he fought the klan out their real hard. so when my mother was in europe, she fought for the gypsies. for life. that is why she took me to haiti. she believes very much in the flag of equality in all things. and cornell west is her great hero. tavis: so you mentioned your daughter maya who is now 14. who is an artist in her own right. so it is not just navigating being a parent. your a show-biz guy who has a daughter who is already in show biz. how're you navigating that? and you perform with her. i saw that thing on youtube. >> what do you do with the kid? she said that whole thing up. kids are not like little puppies that you can control and have them do everything. she writes songs and she sings songs and she believes and herself. i was doing explores. i am not in the position to tell her she cannot be an artist. i am in a position to tell her that i do know a little something about how to have a meani
-conscious policy violated her civil and constitutional rights. in 2003 the supreme court endorsed the use of race as a factor in freshmen admissions. so, representative edwards, is affirmative action still necessary? >> absolutely, i think the commitment of the american dream actually rests with affirmative action, it requires it, i hope the supreme court does the right thing. >> i think that we're looking at different neutral different alternatives in talking about these issues on affirmative action. >> yeah, i agree. unfortunately until we start making serious changes in education system and i think it's necessary, affirmative action is necessary for inclusion and for diverse environment in the university system. >> i think 'farmtive action has become a crutch that we aren't revisiting education and how we're failing so many of our kids. until we do that maybe we do need it but i think we have failed our kids by not improving education. >> there was a very interesting article in "the atlantic" which is progressive publication talking about how affirmative action was giving higher scores to lati
should have shown more courage. >> there were. on civil rights he did not use the bully pulpit as well as he should have. >> rose: richard nixon said he was devious. >> yes. you can have in great quote that eisnehower was a more devious man than people realized and i mean that in the best sense of the word. and he was being sincere and wasn't being funny it is true, eisenhower was deef you in the best sense of the word. >> rose: devious in what way? >> well, he would play dumb is one thing i love about the guy guy talkable about his confidence, once before a conference his aides are coming and saying mr. president you have to be careful, you have to be careful and eisenhower said don't worry i will just confuse them. and he did. and can you imagine a president today being intentionally kind of confusing and dim-witted, but it was useful for eisenhower. >> rose: something about they don't know how dumb i am or i am dumber than they think. >> he was quoted as a dumb bunny he is not, he used to reached micha but it was effective to be underestimated and learned that early in life. maybe h
military leaders, businesses, as well as civil rights organizations. >> ifill: and this laib test whether any of those kind of things matter, i suppose. >> absolutely. >> ifill: marcia coyle. >> ifill: ray suarez has more on the larger stakes and potential fallout arising from today's arguments. >> suarez: and for that, we turn to two people who have been a big part of the national conversation surrounding this case. debo adegbile is the acting president and director-counsel of the n.a.a.c.p. legal defense and educational fund, which filed an amicus brief in this case. and richard kahlenberg is a senior fellow at the century foundation. he wrote a recent report arguing for race-neutral admission policies that he says foster diversity. you were at the court, debo. what's at stake under coming classes of rising freshmen and their families seeking admission to public universities in this case? >> well, the stakes are very high. it's clear that everybody recognized today that diversity in higher education is a compelling interest. it's something that benefit all the-- all the students benefit
: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's convention. >> i would remind you that extremism in
be seen again in the history of civilization. climate changes are not imaginary, not theoretical, not based on computer models. it's right there in front of you. >> there is more at bill moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see moyers.com. i'll see you there and i'll see you here next time. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com de nrns don't wait a week. to get more moyers visit bill moyers.com for exclusive blogs, essays and video features. this episode is available on dvd for $19.95. to order call or write to the address on your screen. funding is provided by carnegie corporation of new york celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the coalberg foundation. independent production fund with support from the partridge foundation. a john and poly guf charitable fund. the cle meant foundation. park foundation dedicated to heightening public awareness of public issues. the herb alpert foundation. the bernard and audrey rapoport foundation. the john d. and kathryn t. mcarthur foundation committed to build a more peaceful wor
are already sending americans but fewer of them. >> that's right, we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria. where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >>s it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya, one fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war, it has seep mood a regional war. are you in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area of the world. and, in fact f, in fact t blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the turks,
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)